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Guidelines:

EBIPM Assessment Guidelines
EBIPM Assessment Guidelines

Researching Cultivation History: A Step-by-Step Guide to Obtaining Historical Records 
Researching Cultivation History

Applying Ecologically Based Invasive Plant Management
Applying EBIPM

 Ecological Principles for Invasive Plant Management
Ecological Principles for IPM 

Establishing a Weed Prevention Area User's Guide
Establishing a Weed Prevention Area 

More Guidelines:

Grazing Invasive Annual Grasses: The Green and Brown Guide
Grazing Invasive Annual Grasses

 Using Weather Data to Improve Decision-making for Rangeland Restoration Efforts
Using Weather Data
Revegetation Guidelines for the Great Basin
Revegetation Guidelines for the Great Basin
Adaptive Management for Invasive Annual Grasses
Adaptive Management for Invasive Annual Grasses 
 

Videos and other products:

Science-Driven Invasive Plant Management
Science-Driven Invasive Plant Management video

Implementing EBIPM: In the Field
Implenting EBIPM video

A Working Ranch with an effective medusahead management program
A Working Ranch
video
 

the Weed Wheel
the Weed Wheel

 EBIPM Resource Handbook
EBIPM Resource Handbook

EBIPM Assessment Guidelines has been developed to assist land managers in pinpointing ecological processes not functioning in complex ecosystems. As invasive annual grasses continue to spread, it is clear that "business as usual" on rangelands is not getting the job done (is not solving the weed problem). This guide merges Rangeland Health Assessment together with EBIPM to identify not only the problem but also the cause of the problem, which can more successfully lead to our ultimate goal, fixing the problem.

Download the PDF or request your free copy here.

For the additional Assessment Worksheets mentioned on pages 12 and 19, click here.

 

EBIPM Assessment Guidelines

Researching Cultivation History A Step-by-Step Guide to Obtaining Historical Records highlights how cultivation history can have surprisingly long-lasting impacts on vegetation, soils, and hydrology after crop production ends. These changes can influence the management decisions and treatments that are being considered. This guide is designed to help land owners, land managers, and scientists with step-by-step instructions for researching valuable cultivation history of the land on which they work.

Request a free copy or download the PDF.

  Researching Cultivation History: A Step-by-Step Guide to Obtaining Historical Records

Applying Ecologically-Based Invasive Plant Management: An Introduction and Overview provides a look at the step-by-step method of managing invasive weeds using science-based solutions.

Click here to request your free copy today.

You can also download the PDF here.

For the additional Assessment Worksheets mentioned on page 9 of Applying EBIPM, click here.

 

Applying Ecologically Based Invasive Plant Management


Ecological Principles for Invasive Plant Management guides you through the basic, scientific/ecological principles of dealing with invasive plants so you can stop treating symptoms and start treating the true causes of invasion.

 Click here to request your free copy. 

Or you can also download the PDF here.

 

Ecological Principles for Invasive Plant Management


Establishing a Weed Prevention Area A step-by-step user's guide' shifts the focus of weed management from reacting with expensive restoration to taking a proactive and more economical approach: prevention. This guide provides groups interested in setting up a viable prevention program in their area with the steps and resources to initiate and develop a weed prevention area.

Click here to request your free copy today or download the PDF here.

 

Establishing a Weed Prevention Area User's Guide


Grazing Invasive Annual Grasses: The Green and Brown Guide outlines a simple, cost-effective method of managing invasive annual grasses through livestock grazing. The Green and Brown Strategy can help you manage your annual grasses and actually provides some direct benefits in animal production. This method of grazing is simple and can help control annual grasses while allowing perennial grasses to re-occupy the sites and generate more animal production.

Click here to request your free copy today or download the PDF here.

 

Grazing Invasive Annual Grasses: The Green and Brown Guide


 

Using Weather Data to Improve Decision-making for Rangeland Restoration Efforts outlines fome specific strategies for using weather information in the EBIPM planning process for rangeland restoration and post-management treatment evaluation. Weather and climate variability have an enormous impact on rangeland restoration and establishment success in the Great Basin which makes the crucial information in this guide a valuable resource for land and resource managers, land owners, and others.

Download the PDF or click here to request your free copy today.

 

Using Weather Data to Improve Decision-making for Rangeland Restoration Efforts


 

Revegetation Guidelines for the Great Basin: Considering Invasive Weeds provides an in-depth, step-by-step guide to the processes and procedures of establishing desired plant species in the Great Basin ecosystem.

 Click here to request your free copy. 

 Or click here to download the PDF.

 

Revegetation Guidelines for the Great Basin


Adaptive Management for Invasive Annual Grasses guides you through the necessary steps to implement adaptive management on your land. 

Click here to request your free copy.

Or click here to download the PDF.

For the additional data sheets mentioned on page 24 of Adaptive Management, click here.

 

Adaptive Management for Invasive Annual Grasses


Implementing EBIPM: Science-Driven Invasive Plant Management  addresses one of the key issues that land managers face: recognizing that when invasive species begin to establish, the weeds themselves are not the actual cause of the problem. The weeds are merely a symptom of the problem, which is, more often than not, an ecological process in disrepair. The science of rangeland management is ecology and just as with any other science, there are principles that govern the science. This video outlines many of those ecological principles so managers can combine their knowledge and experience with ecology to make decisions that have a greater likelihood of success and sustainability.

View the video online or click here to request your free copy.

 

Science-Driven Invasive Plant Management


Implementing EBIPM: In the Field takes you into the field with the the range ecologists and scientists and plant physiologists who've developed this decision-making process that offers science-based solutions to assist land and resource managers in applying treatments that work best for your specific situation.

These solutions offer the ability to fix what is ultimately causing the problem rather than just treating the symptoms of the problem. 

View it online or click here to request your free copy.

 

Implementing EBIPM: In the Field


A Working Ranch with an effective medusahead management program follows the science-based management plan developed to treat an increasing infestation of medusahead, and other annual grasses, at the Circle Bar Ranch in Mitchell, Oregon

View the video online or request your free copy here.

 

A Working Ranch with an effective medusahead management program


The Weed Wheel
Start preventing the dispersal of invasive plants today!

Follow these simple instructions to create your own Weed Wheel now.
View the PDF and print your Weed Wheel here.
Or order your free Weed Wheel here.

The Weed Wheel is adapted from Fig. 2 of "A Conceptual Framework for Preventing the Spatial Dispersal of Invasive Plants" by Kirk Davies and Roger Sheley. 2007 Weed Science 55:178-184

 


the Weed Wheel


EBIPM Resource Handbook

Contains one copy of each of the products listed above and an additional "Supplemental Reading" CD that includes the scientific journal articles which provide the basis for the EBIPM framework, principles and management guidelines. 

Request your free EBIPM Resource Handbook here.

 

EBIPM Resource Handbook

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